Jump to content

Who do you remember/ honour?



Recommended Posts

From some of the comments, it's clear this game is much more than a simple sports event.

It should not take anything away from the day itself but for me its a prelude  that provides flashes of memories of my mother's father...William Barker who fought in the Somme and was badly injured but happily survived and came back to Oz to start a family.

Sadly he was a fanatical South Melbourne supporter in later years and tried to convert me as a young kid from following my dad's one true and only team.

I suppose I'm one of the older members of the Dland community.

I'm guessing there are quite a few younger ones who are possibly ex or current servicemen or women.

Honour your relatives, loved ones or mate or even yourself with a deserving Dland shoutout.

Lest we forget.

Edited by leave it to deever
  • Like 5
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My great grandfather Raymond Harbour fought in France in WWI, and while he came home alive, he did have a bullet lodged in him for the rest of his life that couldn't be removed.  My mother attempted to trace her family tree, and couldn't go much further back than Raymond (her paternal grandfather) as it seems he was adopted as a young child - the records were not very well kept on these back in the late 19th century.  We do know he was brought up in Bendigo, and that was where my grandfather was born.  Pop Harbour was a very private man who did not like to speak much about his war experiences, however he did live until 1974, and one time, when my auntie was pregnant with my cousin Karen, Pop just one day opened up and just started talking.  My uncle and mum started to record what he was talking about, and I wish I knew where that tape was.  Not long after, Pop died, and then Karen was born.  

 

Edit - I've just discovered this on Pop, talking about his war medals.  Uncle Alan has his medals. - https://vwma.org.au/explore/people/336690

Edited by Katrina Dee Fan
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
  • Love 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
36 minutes ago, Katrina Dee Fan said:

My great grandfather Raymond Harbour fought in France in WWI, and while he came home alive, he did have a bullet lodged in him for the rest of his life that couldn't be removed.  My mother attempted to trace her family tree, and couldn't go much further back than Raymond (her paternal grandfather) as it seems he was adopted as a young child - the records were not very well kept on these back in the late 19th century.  We do know he was brought up in Bendigo, and that was where my grandfather was born.  Pop Harbour was a very private man who did not like to speak much about his war experiences, however he did live until 1974, and one time, when my auntie was pregnant with my cousin Karen, Pop just one day opened up and just started talking.  My uncle and mum started to record what he was talking about, and I wish I knew where that tape was.  Not long after, Pop died, and then Karen was born.  

That's the same year my Grandfather died. We also called him pop or more specifically Poppy.

I remember as a young kid my mother and I would pick him up every Friday Arvo from the Elsternwick RSL and take him home after he'd had a bellow load of beer.

As a young kid that RSL club seemed to have the same ambience and reverence of our  local Catholic Church. 

Funny the things that impress upon you as a youngster.

Maybe they both knew each other.

Edited by leave it to deever
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Katrina Dee Fan said:

 

Edit - I've just discovered this on Pop, talking about his war medals.  Uncle Alan has his medals. - https://vwma.org.au/explore/people/336690

If you are interested, you can get replicas made up. Many places do them. Many families have a custodian of the originals and siblings etc have a set of replicas. Nice display boxes available too.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Left Foot Snap said:

If you are interested, you can get replicas made up. Many places do them. Many families have a custodian of the originals and siblings etc have a set of replicas. Nice display boxes available too.

Made the same post in game day thread. My sister had two of my Grandfather's done. I think it was the department of defence. It's a great way to honour loved ones. And many Ww 1 haven't survived over the years.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had four uncles that served in WW2 two saw action one in New Guinea and one in Dutch East Indies (Indonesia), one was a despatch rider who was badly injured when he came off his bike in the MEast and one who served in Japan as occupation troops. However the one that we think most about is my father-in-law who was in the 8th Division, he fought down through Malaya, captured in Singapore, he spent time in Changi, Burma Railway, back to Changi and then shipped to Japan to work in a mine until the war ended. He was located not far from Nagasaki and he and all prisoners were told that as soon as the US invaded Japan that they would all be executed. He told my wife that when the war concluded the Yanks parachuted in food supplies to them in Red, White and Blue parachutes and that he still got a tear in his eye when he thought about those huge planes and those beautiful parachutes bringing food and supplies to them as the Japanese troops had cleared out when the ceasefire was declared.💕

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Grandfathers cousin was Alf Baud who served in WW1. 
 

He is also Carlton’s youngest ever Premiership captain at 22. He enlisted and was deployed not long after this, got injured and was never able to play again. He was lucky enough to have been able to return and live until the age of 94.
 

Roy ‘up there’ Cazaly said this of him:

‘Another great Carlton player was Alf Baud. He could play anywhere. The younger generation are proud to speak of the amazing balance of Haydn Bunton. I think that Baud, by comparison, would have made Bunton look ordinary. Baud would have been a football sensation had it not been for the war. That finished his career.
 

His war injuries were severe.


You would have stopped Baud one minute, or should I say you thought you had stopped him; then in a flash he was past you. He was a thinker. Every counter you met him with was in turn countered by this most elusive footballer. Baud was one of the greatest players we have produced. I don't think he ever reached his top. — Roy Cazaly, 5 June 1937

 

I think of him on Anzac Day. The older I get the more visceral sadness, anger and disgust I feel at the waste and destruction of entire generations of young people. 
 

Lest we forget. 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Both my grandfather's served in World War II in the Pacific. One in the Royal Australian Artillery and one in the RAAF. I'm in my mid 30s and I was fascinated by the boys own stories they would often recount to me as I was growing up and they've remained particularly close to me.

My great-uncle and great grandfather also served in World War I. 

I myself haven't served in the ADF, but I've had close associations and very strong contacts with many enlisted members of the ADF and have worked in a collegiate environment among them, tomorrow will be a special day. 

Lest We Forget. 

Edited by BLWNBA
  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My grandfather was a vet from WW1. Like many others he didn’t like to talk about the war. But there is one special story about him that we will never forget. He didn’t drink, smoke gamble or play cards, except on one occasion he did - while his platoon was on a long distance train travel.  He played cards that night and gambling was involved. It turns out he was a healthy winner, so with his profits he purchased a camera. He then became popular as his mates all wanted photos to send home. He saved every dollar he earned from this side venture. He was either expensive or it was a long campaign, because when he returned to western Victoria after the war, he used his savings to purchase a bus, and started a bus line based in Hamilton and heading to and fro Portland, among other places.  Ultimately he sold that business to a young up and comer by the name of Reg Ansett snr who obviously was able to grow the business exponentially and ultimately expanded into the airline business. 
My grandfather never played cards or gambled again. Not sure about the drink though. It’s he who I fondly remember each and every ANZAC day.
Lest we forget.

  • Like 3
  • Love 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Neil Crompton said:

My grandfather was a vet from WW1. Like many others he didn’t like to talk about the war. But there is one special story about him that we will never forget. He didn’t drink, smoke gamble or play cards, except on one occasion he did - while his platoon was on a long distance train travel.  He played cards that night and gambling was involved. It turns out he was a healthy winner, so with his profits he purchased a camera. He then became popular as his mates all wanted photos to send home. He saved every dollar he earned from this side venture. He was either expensive or it was a long campaign, because when he returned to western Victoria after the war, he used his savings to purchase a bus, and started a bus line based in Hamilton and heading to and fro Portland, among other places.  Ultimately he sold that business to a young up and comer by the name of Reg Ansett snr who obviously was able to grow the business exponentially and ultimately expanded into the airline business. 
My grandfather never played cards or gambled again. Not sure about the drink though. It’s he who I fondly remember each and every ANZAC day.
Lest we forget.

This is a brilliant story mate, thanks for sharing. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Neil Crompton said:

My grandfather was a vet from WW1. Like many others he didn’t like to talk about the war. But there is one special story about him that we will never forget. He didn’t drink, smoke gamble or play cards, except on one occasion he did - while his platoon was on a long distance train travel.  He played cards that night and gambling was involved. It turns out he was a healthy winner, so with his profits he purchased a camera. He then became popular as his mates all wanted photos to send home. He saved every dollar he earned from this side venture. He was either expensive or it was a long campaign, because when he returned to western Victoria after the war, he used his savings to purchase a bus, and started a bus line based in Hamilton and heading to and fro Portland, among other places.  Ultimately he sold that business to a young up and comer by the name of Reg Ansett snr who obviously was able to grow the business exponentially and ultimately expanded into the airline business. 
My grandfather never played cards or gambled again. Not sure about the drink though. It’s he who I fondly remember each and every ANZAC day.
Lest we forget.

Lest we forget mate.

That is an incredibly fascinating story where it could be argued that one of Australia s premier airline had its inception from a couple of decent card hands. 

What a savvy investment during a war. A portable camera in WW1 was a certain rare item that would be in high demand.

Sending possible last photos of oneself to loved ones would make one pay a pretty Penny or Pound.

My mom reckoned her dad never talked about the war either except the nurse who looked after him in a French hospital. Apparently my mom was named after her. Not sure how my Grandma thought about it all.

  • Like 2
  • Love 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spenser Wendell Warne-Smith, 23rd Australian Infantry Battalion, 

Date of Death 04 August 1916, France,

Age 22.

Waldo Esmond Warne-Smith, 6th Australian Infantry Battalion, 

Date of Death 20 September 1918, France,

Age 23.

Awarded Military Cross

Ivor Phillip Scharrer Warne-Smith,  served at Gallipoli (1915 as 17y.o.) & Western Front, 7th Australian Infantry Battalion. 

Charles Warne-Smith, Died 4 June 1922 Suicide by Drowning in the Plenty River, reportedly of grief over the loss of his two eldest sons according to my family.

20240424_062534.jpg

  • Thanks 4
  • Love 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, leave it to deever said:

Made the same post in game day thread. My sister had two of my Grandfather's done. I think it was the department of defence. It's a great way to honour loved ones. And many Ww 1 haven't survived over the years.

Dept of Defence, no. Dept of Veterans Affairs is where you apply for originals. (as well as commerative plaques for the deceased vetrans should anyone need them). The replicas are done by private businesses. There are many. We have one in Brisbane we use. But they are all over the country and lots of backyard vendors who do great jobs also.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I honour my Pop, who went to Gallipoli and thence the Somme.  He survived both campaigns, though not without a major scare.  My sister has the telegram saying he was killed in action.  He wasn't dead, just half dead and missing a goodly chunk of face.  He got patched up and went back to war.  (!!!!)  He would've been right into the high jinks portrayed in the movie, Gallipoli, as evidenced by his absconding and also playing two up at Stonehenge (biggest school ever!  And then the MPs raided it. Alas the outcome is lost to history.) He didn't talk about the war, though he had fond memories of the French and in particular the women.  Just as well he survived because he hadn't met my grandmother at that point so Mum hadn't been born and a dynasty of Demon supporters would never have been born.  Pop died 60 years to the day of the date of the telegram.  It was just a bit early.

My dad was in a protected industry during WWII.  He managed to enlist then got kicked out and sent back to work training the best apprentices he ever had - women.

  • Like 5
  • Love 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both my grandfathers fought in WWI. One was highly decorated, badly wounded and later married my grandmother whose first husband was killed in the war. The other was a colourful character whose exploits during the war are best not mentioned. An uncle fought in Stalingrad who managed to get out alive. Another uncle was killed in WWII 

Edited by John Crow Batty
  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Luckily most of my family came back but 2 of my Nannas cousins rest in Flanders fields.

My Grandfather was shot through the neck on the Western Front and repatriated home.  His brother went to Gallipoli and came back a broken man.

My father served in the RAAF in the SW Pacific.

My uncle went into captivity at the fall of Singapore.

They do cross my mind.

Lest we forget.

  • Like 3
  • Clap 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My grandfather Andrew Lucas and my great uncle James Scott. Both served in the RAAF in New Guinea.

My grandfather also passed away in 1974 at the age of 51 from lung cancer, my great uncle made it to 93 in 2019. 

Will be thinking of them tonight.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Great great Uncle in the first few days at Gallipoli

Paternal grandfather who flew Spitfires over northern Oz. Not bad for a boy from Tallangatta

Maternal grandfather who was an AIF mechanic in Moresby and Solomons. He’d be rolling in his grave what’s happening there now. Some bloody funny stories of zero raids on their camps. Ended up with a captured Japanese prisoner (called George)  as his assistant . Stayed pen pals for years 

 

They don’t make many like that any more

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m Irish - we’ve had our own struggles - so i don’t know a lot about the ANZACs. 

but my kids are Aussies and i’ve been trying to educate them on the little i know. look back 50 years, 70 years. the world was so different. we are so lucky to live in a stable safe place. 

My love, sympathy and gratitude to you all that have suffered losses through war and protecting our country 

  • Like 3
  • Clap 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My father was in Gallipoli in July 1915, then in France from 1916 till the end of the war. That is how he spent his 17-22 birthdays. Long term I do not think he ever settled down after that. He disappeared when I was 5 and Mum was left woth 4 kids under 5.

Then 20 odd years later I was in Vietnam as a National Serviceman (1967-68)

So Anzac day is a genuine day of reflection (on how lucky we are to have a life)

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Love 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I knew Gav during my time in Afghan. RIP mate. 

Lance Corporal Gavin was born in Manly, NSW, in 1982. He enlisted in the Army in 2004. On completion of his basic training and initial employment training he was posted as an infantryman to the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment, in Townsville in 2005. He was promoted to Lance Corporal in January 2009. He was a highly-qualified soldier, having completed specialist training as a combat first aider, Pashtu linguist and infantry support weapons operator.

Lance Corporal Gavin was a highly-respected member of the 2nd Battalion. He was acknowledged by his superiors for his positive attitude and loyalty. His subordinate soldiers were motivated by his professionalism, mateship and outstanding specialist skills. He was also known for being a devoted husband and father.

Luke-Gavin-portrait.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 3
  • Love 1
  • Clap 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Demonland Forums  

  • Match Previews, Reports & Articles  

    WARNING by William from Waalitj

    As a long term resident of Waalitj Marawar, I am moved to warn my fellow Narrm fans that a  danger game awaits. The locals are no longer the easybeats who stumbled, fumbled and bumbled their way to the good fortune of gathering the number one draft pick and a generational player in Harley Reid last year. They are definitely better than they were then.   Young Harley has already proven his worth with some stellar performances for a first year kid playing among men. He’s taken hangers, k

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Melbourne Demons 20

    OVER YET? by KC from Casey

    The Friday evening rush hour clash of two of the VFL’s 2024 minnows, Carlton and the Casey Demons was excruciatingly painful to watch, even if it was for the most part a close encounter. I suppose that since the game had to produce a result (a tie would have done the game some justice), the four points that went to Casey with the win, were fully justified because they went to the best team. In that respect, my opinion is based on the fact that the Blues were a lopsided combination that had

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Casey Articles

    CENTIMETRES by Whispering Jack

    Our game is one where the result is often decided by centimetres; the touch of a fingernail, a split-second decision made by a player or official, the angle of vision or the random movement of an oblong ball in flight or in its bounce and trajectory. There is one habit that Melbourne seems to have developed of late in its games against Carlton which is that the Demons keep finding themselves on the wrong end of the stick in terms of the fine line in close games at times when centimetres mak

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Reports

    PREGAME: Rd 10 vs West Coast

    The Demons have a 10 day break before they head on the road to Perth to take on the West Coast Eagles at Optus Stadium on Sunday. Who comes in and who goes out?

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Melbourne Demons 525

    PODCAST: Rd 09 vs Carlton

    The Demonland Podcast will air LIVE on Sunday, 12th May @ 8:30pm. Join George, Binman & I as we analyse the Demons loss at the MCG against the Blues in the Round 09. You questions and comments are a huge part of our podcast so please post anything you want to ask or say below and we'll give you a shout out on the show. If you would like to leave us a voicemail please call 03 9016 3666 and don't worry no body answers so you don't have to talk to a human. Listen & Chat LIVE:

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Melbourne Demons 30

    VOTES: Rd 09 vs Carlton

    Last week Captain Max Gawn consolidated his lead over reigning champion Christian Petracca in the Demonland Player of the Year Award. Steven May, Jake Lever, Jack Viney & Clayton Oliver make up the Top 5. Your votes for the loss against the Blues. 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Melbourne Demons 39

    POSTGAME: Rd 09 vs Carlton

    The Demons were blown out of the water in the first quarter and clawed their way back into the contest but it was a case of too little too late as they lost another close one to Carlton losing by 1 point at the MCG.  

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Melbourne Demons 486

    GAMEDAY: Rd 09 vs Carlton

    It's Game Day and the Demons are once again headlining another blockbuster at the MCG to kick off the round of footy. The Dees take on the Blues and have the opportunity to win their third game on the trot to solidify a spot in the Top 4 in addition to handing the Blues their third consecutive defeat to bundle them out of the Top 8.

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Melbourne Demons 959

    MELBOURNE BUSINESS by The Oracle

    In days of old, this week’s Thursday night AFL match up between the Demons and the Blues would be framed on the basis of the need to redress the fact that Carlton “stole” last year’s semi final away from Melbourne and with it, their hopes for the premiership.  A hot gospelling coach might point out to his charges that they were the better team on the night in all facets and that poor kicking for goal and a couple of lapses at the death cost them what was rightfully theirs. Moreover, now was

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Previews 1
  • Tell a friend

    Love Demonland? Tell a friend!
×
×
  • Create New...