Jump to content

Lucifer's Hero

Illicit Drug Use in AFL

Recommended Posts

Over the last week there have been a lot of claims and counter claims:

- players using 'mental health issues' to avoid testing.  The implication is they don't actually have a mental health issue.  This excuse was used by 16 players from one club according to Ross Stevenson from 3AW.  This was rebuked by Eddie, AFLPA, AFL.

- Grant Thomas was told (after his coaching finished at the Saints) that unbeknown to him, drug use was 'rife' among the players during his reign.  Strongly rebuked by Nick Del Santo and Spider Everett.

Now Nick Reiwoldt says:

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/a-free-for-all-riewoldt-lashes-players-over-afl-illicit-drug-policy-20190225-p50zzs.html

“The AFL, by their own admission on their own website, what the policy is designed to do is to identify players with substance abuse issues and place support around them to protect their health and wellbeing...the vast majority of players don’t have substance abuse issues, they’re taking the [censored] because the system allows it.

"It depends what your definition of out of control is. I would say it’s out of control.”  Riewoldt called for players to be hit with a four-week ban on the first strike.

“What I would say, if they’re serious about getting the number closer to zero, remove the safety net,” he said. “If players do have a legitimate substance abuse issue, then getting a suspension on their first detection is probably the least of their worries. They need to get their life together".

How often do we hear of a player having an injury, personal issues, mental health issues or glandular fever and are out of the game for 4 weeks.  Without casting dispersions on people with those issues, its hard not to think a '4 week suspension is being played out' for a second strike. 

I agree with Nick:  first strike and 4 weeks suspension.  No excuses for avoiding testing either.

The AFL has said it will review its drug policy.  Code for getting it out of the media.

I certainly hope that the club with allegedly 16 players using 'mental health issues' isn't the demons.  I reckon Mahoney and or Goodwin would get wind of it somehow and make sure the culprits are weeded out one way or another.  So doubt it is us.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Lucifer's Hero said:

Over the last week there have been a lot of claims and counter claims:

- players using 'mental health issues' to avoid testing.  The implication is they don't actually have a mental health issue.  This excuse was used by 16 players from one club according to Ross Stevenson from 3AW.  This was rebuked by Eddie, AFLPA, AFL.

- Grant Thomas was told (after his coaching finished at the Saints) that unbeknown to him, drug use was 'rife' among the players during his reign.  Strongly rebuked by Nick Del Santo and Spider Everett.

Now Nick Reiwoldt says:

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/a-free-for-all-riewoldt-lashes-players-over-afl-illicit-drug-policy-20190225-p50zzs.html

“The AFL, by their own admission on their own website, what the policy is designed to do is to identify players with substance abuse issues and place support around them to protect their health and wellbeing...the vast majority of players don’t have substance abuse issues, they’re taking the [censored] because the system allows it.

"It depends what your definition of out of control is. I would say it’s out of control.”  Riewoldt called for players to be hit with a four-week ban on the first strike.

“What I would say, if they’re serious about getting the number closer to zero, remove the safety net,” he said. “If players do have a legitimate substance abuse issue, then getting a suspension on their first detection is probably the least of their worries. They need to get their life together".

How often do we hear of a player having an injury, personal issues, mental health issues or glandular fever and are out of the game for 4 weeks.  Without casting dispersions on people with those issues, its hard not to think a '4 week suspension is being played out' for a second strike. 

I agree with Nick:  first strike and 4 weeks suspension.  No excuses for avoiding testing either.

The AFL has said it will review its drug policy.  Code for getting it out of the media.

I certainly hope that the club with allegedly 16 players using 'mental health issues' isn't the demons.  I reckon Mahoney and or Goodwin would get wind of it somehow and make sure the culprits are weeded out one way or another.  So doubt it is us.

 

Over the last few years we have seen players traded from a number Clubs for reasons which appear strange given their obvious talent!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there should be a no tolerance policy for those caught. I have never been a fan of a three strikes policy.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Demonland said:

I think there should be a no tolerance policy for those caught. I have never been a fan of a three strikes policy.

Just to clarify.  The policy is currently 4 weeks out for second strike. 

Nick is saying 4 weeks for first strike ie zero tolerance.   Agree with Nick and yourself.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One strike and I lose my job. The AFL are ridiculously lenient on their players. I have no doubt that this ‘leniency’ contributes to players dabbling in illegal drug use. 

Edited by Ethan Tremblay
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Ethan Tremblay said:

One strike and I lose my job. The AFL are ridiculously lenient on their players. I have no doubt that this ‘leniency’ contributes to players dabbling in illegal drug use. 

The afl's lenience is all due to their negotiations with the players union. They agreed to this system a few years back for agreement on payment things. Now they are stuck with it and have to try and negotiate their way out. Good luck with that one Gill.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another area of concern raised recently was the amount of players dodging tests. Surely test dodgers, in particular repeat offenders, should be treated harshly too.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know of 1 bloke who missed a finals series cause of "mental health" issues.
Can't have the biggest name in the game tarred with the drug brush can we.

  • Like 1
  • Angry 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many sports bodies such as the AFL are conflicted. 

They don't want the sport tarnished with the words drug use, doping, illicit drug use, drug cheats etc. It damages the sport, the individuals and as they say these days, it damages the product morally, ethically and financially.

So they adopt a no-drugs policy and put into place rules and procedures to police drug use.

On the other hand, sports bodies hope and pray that teams and individuals don't get caught. 

The response of sports bodies has differed over recent years.  In cycling and most Olympic sports, testing, monitoring and surveillance has significantly increased over recent years with a real effort being made to catch drug cheats. Rigorous testing procedures have been introduced to make it ever more difficult to cheat without the increased risk of being caught. 

However, many team based sports including football, basketball and even cricket have lax drug policies and procedures that make it less likely that offenders will be caught and punished.  The AFL "go lightly" approach has been influenced by the players association and those who accept the need for a policy but don't want a rigorous testing regime that might actually catch offenders (and damage the brand).

It was not long ago that a certain AFL head honcho, repeatedly stated that unlike sports such as cycling and athletics, AFL did not have a problem.  Well your not going to identify if there is a problem, when the policy and testing regime is so loose that you can drive a truck through. However, it maintained a very convenient image for the sport.  

The other problem in sport is that the nature of drug use has changed

In the past, drug use was associated with using banned substances that provided a competitive advantage/resulting in cheating. A la Lance Armstrong, Russian and Chinese athletes, EFC and so on. 

The use of substances that assist in gaining a competitive advantage remains a problem.

However, in recent years, we have witnessed an explosion in the use of substances (like coke and ice) for recreational pleasure, This is a massive problem as it now exists in epidemic proportions right through society.  The task of monitoring social use is nigh impossible because it is so widespread and the drugs do not stay in the system. At a sports level, we know that athletes and players use substances for pleasure and because they can get away with it.   They will not get caught (unless their stupid enough to be filmed) and it allows them to use drugs without interfering in training, recovery and playing. 

There is no sports body that can deal with this epidemic. It is a criminal, social and health issue across the land and the globe that we are all living with.  And any effort to control or arrest this spread of illicit substances is virtually impossible unless supply is cut off and ordinary people stop using them. 

No doubt there are folks on this site who enjoy and are addicted to recreational drugs, just as hundreds of thousands of citizens are addicted to pain killing narcotics and prescribed drugs such as endone, oxycontin, morphine and codeine.  

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately non performance enhancing drug use is rife in the AFL...fact.

I've been reliably told the figure is above 60% at one top club, so you can take it to the bank it's similar across the board including our club.

The only reason the AFL should be involved in policing non performance enhancing drugs is the issue it may cause down the track with gambling. In other words players getting involved with criminals.

Any punitive actions taking on drug use are counterproductive to my way of thinking.

Get serious on the performance enhancing stuff and the opportunities to fix matches or outcomes.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did sound like that.
But hell, Lary Gyon used the old mental health chesnut to hide from the media after banging his best mates missus for a couple years.
So its got multiple uses.

Edited by Fork 'em
  • Like 1
  • Shocked 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, rjay said:

Unfortunately non performance enhancing drug use is rife in the AFL...fact.

I've been reliably told the figure is above 60% at one top club, so you can take it to the bank it's similar across the board including our club.

The only reason the AFL should be involved in policing non performance enhancing drugs is the issue it may cause down the track with gambling. In other words players getting involved with criminals.

Any punitive actions taking on drug use are counterproductive to my way of thinking.

Get serious on the performance enhancing stuff and the opportunities to fix matches or outcomes.

Very good points. 

The newly formed sports watchdog (Sports Integrity Australia, which will absorb ASADA) has asked the AFL for info about player testing (sans player names) https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/watchdog-urges-afl-to-hand-over-drug-info-20190219-p50yoz.html

Unsurprisingly, the ALFPA are anti; can't find an AFL response but suspect they would be anti as well.  Personally, I can't see the problem with giving the SIA data without player names.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pushing for zero tolerance is ridiculous, you think an off season is a long time without footy, imagine a lifetime!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Lucifer's Hero said:

Very good points. 

The newly formed sports watchdog (Sports Integrity Australia, which will absorb ASADA) has asked the AFL for info about player testing (sans player names) https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/watchdog-urges-afl-to-hand-over-drug-info-20190219-p50yoz.html

Unsurprisingly, the ALFPA are anti; can't find an AFL response but suspect they would be anti as well.  Personally, I can't see the problem with giving the SIA data without player names.

There is the rub LH. The AFL would have to admit to a problem. Right now their line is that there is no problem.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if you do get a 3rd strike, you just need to retire for a year and then change your mind. All good, get straight back onto your old clubs list, no questions asked, no drafting required.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It all gets down to performance enhancing. If they get done for enhancement drugs then throw the book at them without any warnings. On the other hand if they are blowing a couple of pipes during the week which is not an enhancement then so what ? That is their business.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lucifer's Hero said:

Very good points. 

The newly formed sports watchdog (Sports Integrity Australia, which will absorb ASADA) has asked the AFL for info about player testing (sans player names) https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/watchdog-urges-afl-to-hand-over-drug-info-20190219-p50yoz.html

Unsurprisingly, the ALFPA are anti; can't find an AFL response but suspect they would be anti as well.  Personally, I can't see the problem with giving the SIA data without player names.

No institution willingly submits to an independent umpire unless it is imposed on them and they see there is no choice. We have all seen the consequences of self-regulation. It is biased and a recipe for abuse or at least minimum adherence.  

Without ASADA, what would have happened at EFC? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are multiple players taking drugs in the offseason and long weekends - absolutely. 
Are some players taking drugs more regularly than that - maybe every weekend in the preseason and the night after the game in season  - sure.

But you're struggling to play elite AFL footy if you're launching in to big weekends every week and I reckon we've seen that with some of our players if you know where to look. I reckon you can count in one hand the number of truly elite players who could keep that lifestyle going.

The majority of AFL players get in long term relationships early, settle down and live a pretty boring life. 

They are good citizens who do community work, are super professional about their trade and the last few offseasons has shown are really low level of crime and disorderly behaviour. Certainly compared with their NRL colleagues in Northern states.

What good comes from punishing AFL players with really harsh illicit drug policies? Do we all feel a little better about ourselves because our heroes are all clean skins? Do we feel morally superior?

The current policy has stopped a repeat Ben Cousins. That was its aim and it has been successful. 

Club culture can take care of the rest. How hard is it for a coach to get with his leadership group and set standards about behaviour and work out which players are going too hard and sort it out? Trade, delist, play in the 2nds. You'll sort it out in no time.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DeeSpencer said:

Are multiple players taking drugs in the offseason and long weekends - absolutely. 
Are some players taking drugs more regularly than that - maybe every weekend in the preseason and the night after the game in season  - sure.

But you're struggling to play elite AFL footy if you're launching in to big weekends every week and I reckon we've seen that with some of our players if you know where to look. I reckon you can count in one hand the number of truly elite players who could keep that lifestyle going.

The majority of AFL players get in long term relationships early, settle down and live a pretty boring life. 

They are good citizens who do community work, are super professional about their trade and the last few offseasons has shown are really low level of crime and disorderly behaviour. Certainly compared with their NRL colleagues in Northern states.

What good comes from punishing AFL players with really harsh illicit drug policies? Do we all feel a little better about ourselves because our heroes are all clean skins? Do we feel morally superior?

The current policy has stopped a repeat Ben Cousins. That was its aim and it has been successful. 

Club culture can take care of the rest. How hard is it for a coach to get with his leadership group and set standards about behaviour and work out which players are going too hard and sort it out? Trade, delist, play in the 2nds. You'll sort it out in no time.

You make some good points.

We are all biased to a degree but I have confidence in club culture and the standards set by leaders such as Jones, Viney, Jetta etc.  Both the perception and inside goss is that these guys are absolute leaders and sticklers about standards and having professional behaviours.  They are squeaky clean guys who do not stand for sub standard behaviour. And we have seen their influence on the kids and one or two trades. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, DeeSpencer said:

Are multiple players taking drugs in the offseason and long weekends - absolutely. 
Are some players taking drugs more regularly than that - maybe every weekend in the preseason and the night after the game in season  - sure.

But you're struggling to play elite AFL footy if you're launching in to big weekends every week and I reckon we've seen that with some of our players if you know where to look. I reckon you can count in one hand the number of truly elite players who could keep that lifestyle going.

The majority of AFL players get in long term relationships early, settle down and live a pretty boring life. 

They are good citizens who do community work, are super professional about their trade and the last few offseasons has shown are really low level of crime and disorderly behaviour. Certainly compared with their NRL colleagues in Northern states.

What good comes from punishing AFL players with really harsh illicit drug policies? Do we all feel a little better about ourselves because our heroes are all clean skins? Do we feel morally superior?

The current policy has stopped a repeat Ben Cousins. That was its aim and it has been successful. 

Club culture can take care of the rest. How hard is it for a coach to get with his leadership group and set standards about behaviour and work out which players are going too hard and sort it out? Trade, delist, play in the 2nds. You'll sort it out in no time.

Spot on ds. Particularly in regard to the confected moral outrage. Particularly from ex players from 80s and 90s when the prevailing culture was excessive alcohol use.

II care about how players prepare, train and perform. If they can do those things well  I could care less if demon players use recreational drugs. 

My view is the players should never have agreed to include testing for recreational drugs.l in the first place Just stuck to performance enhancing only.

And the AFL made a rod for it's own back including testing for recreational drugs. Stupid. I understand their motivation  (getting treatment for players) but they should have stayed well clear of something that is none of their business. That said I as applaud the hark min approach they have taken.

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DeeSpencer said:

Are multiple players taking drugs in the offseason and long weekends - absolutely. 
Are some players taking drugs more regularly than that - maybe every weekend in the preseason and the night after the game in season  - sure.

But you're struggling to play elite AFL footy if you're launching in to big weekends every week and I reckon we've seen that with some of our players if you know where to look. I reckon you can count in one hand the number of truly elite players who could keep that lifestyle going.

The majority of AFL players get in long term relationships early, settle down and live a pretty boring life. 

They are good citizens who do community work, are super professional about their trade and the last few offseasons has shown are really low level of crime and disorderly behaviour. Certainly compared with their NRL colleagues in Northern states.

What good comes from punishing AFL players with really harsh illicit drug policies? Do we all feel a little better about ourselves because our heroes are all clean skins? Do we feel morally superior?

The current policy has stopped a repeat Ben Cousins. That was its aim and it has been successful. 

Club culture can take care of the rest. How hard is it for a coach to get with his leadership group and set standards about behaviour and work out which players are going too hard and sort it out? Trade, delist, play in the 2nds. You'll sort it out in no time.

Is it unreasonable for me to want the players that play for my club to abstain from recreational drugs in order to achieve the maximum in peak performance in the prime of their playing careers?

These guys get paid a boat load to play at their best and be in peak physical and mental conditioning. I don't want them to be robots and they don't have to be choir boys but I don't want them to be off their nut or out of their skins on the weekends. I want premierships which means for 26 weeks in and out and for the preseasons their minds and bodies need to be on the job to achieve that.

There is no room for recreational drugs to infect the minds and bodies of elite athletes.

I'm not a prude and I don't by the line of what they do in their off time during the season is their business. Their business is to win and you can't win if your mind is on Saturday night.

Edited by Deeminion
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Lucifer's Hero said:

Over the last week there have been a lot of claims and counter claims:

- players using 'mental health issues' to avoid testing.  The implication is they don't actually have a mental health issue.  This excuse was used by 16 players from one club according to Ross Stevenson from 3AW.  This was rebuked by Eddie, AFLPA, AFL.

- Grant Thomas was told (after his coaching finished at the Saints) that unbeknown to him, drug use was 'rife' among the players during his reign.  Strongly rebuked by Nick Del Santo and Spider Everett.

Now Nick Reiwoldt says:

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/a-free-for-all-riewoldt-lashes-players-over-afl-illicit-drug-policy-20190225-p50zzs.html

“The AFL, by their own admission on their own website, what the policy is designed to do is to identify players with substance abuse issues and place support around them to protect their health and wellbeing...the vast majority of players don’t have substance abuse issues, they’re taking the [censored] because the system allows it.

"It depends what your definition of out of control is. I would say it’s out of control.”  Riewoldt called for players to be hit with a four-week ban on the first strike.

“What I would say, if they’re serious about getting the number closer to zero, remove the safety net,” he said. “If players do have a legitimate substance abuse issue, then getting a suspension on their first detection is probably the least of their worries. They need to get their life together".

How often do we hear of a player having an injury, personal issues, mental health issues or glandular fever and are out of the game for 4 weeks.  Without casting dispersions on people with those issues, its hard not to think a '4 week suspension is being played out' for a second strike. 

I agree with Nick:  first strike and 4 weeks suspension.  No excuses for avoiding testing either.

The AFL has said it will review its drug policy.  Code for getting it out of the media.

I certainly hope that the club with allegedly 16 players using 'mental health issues' isn't the demons.  I reckon Mahoney and or Goodwin would get wind of it somehow and make sure the culprits are weeded out one way or another.  So doubt it is us.

 

How does citing mental health issues enable a player to bypass a drug test?

Why did the players ever agree to hair testing, was it tied into the EBA?

 

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Social Media

  • Match Previews, Reports & Articles

    BACK IN STYLE by Whispering Jack

    From the moment when the Elton John character in the movie “Rocketman” burst into its opening scene dressed as a flamboyant demon on his way to an addiction rehabilitation session, the game was on. Here was yet another film about a person gifted with a meteoric rise to stardom finding coke, booze and a hedonistic lifestyle that led directly to a destructive crash into the abyss. Ultimately, these stories end in total disaster (“A Star is Born”, “Bohemian Rhapsody”, “Judy”) but this one resulted

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Special Features

    THE TRADING CHRONICLES 2019

    PART ONE - OVERTURE  I have a disclaimer at the outset. I’m not a fan of the races - be they horses or motors of any kind. Once the final siren sounds on the football season, I find the month or so that follows and corresponds roughly with the Spring Racing Carnival to be the most boring time of the year for sports fans. You turn on the radio and you’re confronted by the monotonous drone of a self-proclaimed racing expert or by the nasally twang of an ex-jockey banging on about the equine p

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Special Features 8

    CHANGES 2019 by The Oracle

    PART 1 - IT’S A LITTLE MORE COMPLICATED THIS TIME This year’s free agency, trade and draft period will see the usual drama and upheaval as the AFL’s 18 clubs seek to better their lists in order to challenge for finals and possibly premiership honours. Long before the final siren sounded on the season just over a week ago, the maneuvering was under way with player agents and clubs discussing possible player movements and in some cases, deals had already been done.  Yesterday, the r

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Special Features 1

    HOW FAR SOUTH? by George on the Outer

    It was appropriate that Melbourne was playing its last game of season 2019 in Hobart.  After all, how much further south could the team go? And much as it has done in many of the previous 22 games, the side managed to extract a loss from a winning position by simply giving the ball back to the opposition time and time again. In fact, they gave it back to the opposition to the tune of 53 points from turnovers while, by way of contrast North Melbourne contributed  only 17 points to their oppo

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Reports

    COOKED by The Oracle

    I can vividly remember when the Demons ventured onto Blundstone Arena for the first time in early 2016 only to lose to the Kangaroos by 20.11.131 to 21.10.136.    Melbourne was then a team on the up and up: young, enthusiastic and bold. It gave up a huge quarter time deficit after kicking against a strong wind but made that up by half time and fell dramatically short after an exciting high scoring affair.  The team lost no fans that day - they were willing to take the game on and attac

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Previews

    HELP by KC rom Casey

    The Casey Demons finished off their home and away season against Frankston at Skybus Stadium on Sunday with a narrow, unconvincing 6-point victory that left the door slightly open for a top eight berth when the VFL finals begin in a fortnight’s time. While sunny skies prevailed over Frankston in the morning, the skies became overcast by noon and heavy waves pounded the bay nearby as the rains came in to greet the players as the game started. And conditions stayed dark and dreary for the rem

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Casey Articles

    THANKS BUT NO THANKS by George on the Outer

    Thanks, but no thanks! In a round where the club was supposed to thank their fans for the support during the year, the Melbourne Football Club chose to do otherwise with a 53 point loss to a team that sat 15th on the ladder.  Don’t give us cheap jumpers that can’t be sold in the Demon shop.  Don’t give us vouchers to shop there, give us something on the field, which is why we come to the football in the first place. It was a disgraceful performance, which started with a disgracefu

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Reports

    SLEEP OUT AT THE MCG by The Oracle

    Around about 12 months ago Melbourne and Sydney fought out an epic battle between two top eight teams fighting for the best possible ladder position in the lead up to the finals. The Swans triumphed by 9 points at the MCG after the Demons came back from five goals down at three quarter time. But for its poor kicking for goal, Melbourne might well have won the game and finished in the top four. Who knows what might then have happened for the club in September? As a consequence, the person re

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Previews

    A LITTLE RAY OF SUNSHINE by KC from Casey

    Two clubs that have been hard hit by injury recently took part in a dour battle under dark clouds and, with intermittent showers falling, it wasn’t a pretty game at Victoria Park on Sunday. Despite all that, the Casey Demons added a little ray of sunshine to their day to get the job done over a "traditional" rival with a 15 point victory over Collingwood VFL that breathed life back into their season. There were a few highlights at the ground that in past days has seen many titanic batt

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Casey Articles

    THE RETRO ROUND by George on the Outer

    We have seen it all before… Yes, a wonderful idea to showcase what used to be in football.  Big crowds, umpires who knew how to apply the rules and not opinions, high marks, skilful players. But for the Melbourne supporters their retro is what it has been like for the past 10 years. Losing games, end on end, year after year.  Opportunities squandered in front of goal. VFL standard players running around at the MCG. Just more of the same, and the game against Collingwood was no ex

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Reports

    THE PEOPLE SPEAK by The Demonland Crew

    Thanks to Demonlanders for their input into this week’s preview. Ralphius Maximus is short and bittersweet: We'll crack in at the bounce to create a contest, win our share of the ball, butcher the forward movement and get scored on easily from the intercepts. Not that hard to predict. Big Demon says: Unfortunately Collingwood will win because they have a lot more to play for. We will be good in parts but really the season is well over so we will have to put up with those bell

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Previews

    WHAT, NO BLOOD? by George on the Outer

    The feeling when turning up to the MCG on a Saturday night to play a top four side in Richmond, while the Melbourne sits cemented in close proximity to the bottom of the table is like attending the Colosseum in Ancient Roman times. The expectation is that a bloodbath is about to occur. There are 100,000 Richmond members and 50,000 Melbourne members, and despite the fact that it turned out to be a wet night after half-time, a crowd of only 37K bothered to turn up. That should never have happ

    Demonland
    Demonland |
    Match Reports

×
×
  • Create New...