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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/29/2010 in Status Updates

  1. Hi Soupless. I had always wondered about the origins of your avatar. Today in France’s cold and wet lockdown I watched some old Seinfeld episodes. I think I discovered it. Right? a bientôt.
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  2. Robbo Q&A: Christian Petracca reveals the secrets behind his super season Christian Petracca is finally delivering on his enormous potential. And the reason why? His girlfriend Bella has had plenty to do with it. Mark Robinson goes head to head with the brilliant playmaker ... and Bella. Mark Robinson, Herald Sun Subscriber only | August 14, 2020 9:23pm People think Christian Petracca is arrogant. He says that’s not right. But he has a new-found self-belief that is fuelling an incredible breakout season. He talks with Mark Robinson about the “zone” he goes into on the field, why he wanted to prove everyone wrong, why he shouldn’t be compared to Dustin Martin, his surprising pre-match routine and why criticism of Demons coach Simon Goodwin is unfair. Mark Robinson: You don’t do a lot of media, why today? Christian Petracca: There’s two reasons. I’ve felt I haven’t really deserved it because I’ve been an inconsistent player, (and) there has been a bit of bad blood between the media and players. But I’m at an age now where I’ve matured and I’m accepting of who I am. I feel like everyone’s going to get to know me anyway in the next few years, so the more I’ve been doing lately the more comfortable I’ve been. MR: What do you mean by bad blood? CP: There’s no bad blood … I don’t know, I just didn’t want to do it, to be honest. I wasn’t ready as a player, I probably wasn’t confident in myself. There wasn’t bad blood, it wasn’t the way to put it. It was probably the inner confidence and that I didn’t really deserve it. MR: Have you wasted years of your football career? CP: Good question. I feel everything happens for a reason. This is my sixth year and the first couple of years do go so quickly, you don’t realise you’re 23, 24 and you’ve only got seven, eight years left of your career. But I have turned the corner this year. My self-belief is at an all-time high. I’m just wanting it now. I think every player goes through a pre-season or some time in their life when they realise they have to grow up. I needed a wake-up call and this year, this pre-season was massive for me understanding who I was as a person. FROM OUR PARTNERS Calling out fake news and putting the media under the spotlight. Watch Kenny on Media 8:30pm Fridays, on Sky News. For more. MR: What’s triggered this? CP: It was the back end of last season. Last year we weren’t great, but I felt like I had a pretty good season but it flew under the radar. I was pretty [censored] off to be honest, I felt like I deserved more credit for my season. Over the off season, I wanted to work as hard as I could and prepare like an athlete and a professional. And it’s translated into my season. It was a ‘[censored] you’ attitude to be honest, I wanted to prove everyone wrong. Watch Footy LIVE & On-Demand Every Day from July 29 – August 17 with Kayo. New to Kayo? Get your 14-day free trial & start streaming instantly > Christian Petracca leaves Jy Simpkin in his wake. Picture: Sarah Reed MR: You travelled to Europe in the off-season with great mate Clayton Oliver. CP: It was a good trip. We did Italy, went to London, a bit of Spain and Germany and two weeks later I went to America with (Christian) Salem. MR: Were you ever jealous of what he was able to achieve as an early 20-something? CP: No. We are a very competitive friendship group and we push each other a lot. We argue on the field, we argue off the field and that’s what friends do. He’s like a brother. MR: By 22, he was a two-time B & F winner and an All-Australian. You’re sure you weren’t envious? CP: Not at all. Everyone starts their career at some point and matures differently. Seeing him succeed was motivation for me to realise that if he could do it, why can’t I? MR: I reckon you’ve got this power step, a skip almost which you do when you win the ball. Do you know what I’m talking about? CP: Not really. Christian Petracca has developed a dynamic sidestep in his game, breaking through a Hawthorn tackle at Giants Stadium earlier this year. Picture. Phil Hillyard MR: It appears you skip and then explode. CP: I have no idea. To be honest, I don’t know half the stuff I do on the field. I play on instinct. I’m in the zone when I play, but I do know one thing, I do like my little spin move, maybe that’s what you’re talking about. MR: No, they used to be called blind turns. CP: That’s right. Dad said that a couple of times when I was a kid. It just helps me get out of traffic and I suppose it comes from my basketball background. MR: What do you see, what do you feel when you’re near or have the ball? Do you now feel a responsibility to change the game? CP : For sure. I always try to make an impact every time I touch the ball. I’m at the age now where I can be that person who can inspire my teammates. I’ve worked too hard not to be that person, I feel it’s in my repertoire to be that person. When I’m unthinking, I’m not playing good footy. In the games I’ve played well in this year, I’ve been relaxed, very calm, knowing my role, knowing what I need to do for the team and everything has fallen into place. The biggest thing I’ve found this year is getting over to contests with speed. MR: It’s the mindset of a player who knows the level he is capable of producing. CP: I agree. I feel I can say those things now because of the belief I have in myself, the confidence I’ve done in my work, and not just that, but the confidence Goody has shown in me when I didn’t have that belief. MR: How hungry you are? Have you now got that killer attitude and desire? CP: I’m developing that kill. This year I’ve really started to take a step to understand it. MR: Understand what exactly? CP: Understanding my ability, understanding who I am and what I need to be doing Monday to Friday. For me, to see what the club went through last year, and the fans, I didn’t want that anymore. What [censored] me off is that we could go through that again. Every time I go out there I want to prove to people we are a good club and we deserve to be up the top of the ladder. MR: And, personally, show people you could be a great player? CP: 100 per cent. But it’s more proving it to myself, to be honest. I don’t care what people think of me, other than my friends, my girlfriend, my teammates and my coaches, but to me it’s about proving to myself I do have what it takes to be a great player. MR: It’s a fine line between being confident and being cocky? CP: There is. You can be arrogant with the way you go about things, but I think the way I go about it, it’s confidence and an inner belief. It’s a very good trait to have. Who doesn’t want to be confident when you go out to play? You don’t want to be second-guessing yourself. MR: You don’t doubt yourself? CP: Not anymore. Yes, you’re not human if you don’t have doubt, but that doubt fuels my anger and aggression in wanting to be better. MR: Do you want to be the best player in the competition? CP: Yeah. Individual accolades are a bonus, because you always want to play in a premiership. But do I want to be the best player in the competition? Yeah, I do. I feel I can, I want to be, but at the same time, I’ve got a lot to do to get the level I know I can get to. Christian Petracca celebrates a goal during Melbourne’s Round 7 clash against Hawthorn. MR: For one of your first interviews in the Herald Sun, the headline was “The Prince of Swagger’’ … CP: It’s a terrible headline (laughing). I don’t have swagger. I didn’t have it back then. MR: You have it now? CP: I don’t know, what do you think? MR: I see a player who has finally realised what he is capable of. That’s not swagger CP: I’m in a whole different head space and I’m a completely different person than what I was five years ago when that article was written. Back then, it was about managing my emotions and stress levels and the coping mechanisms needed in this industry. The expectations on myself haven’t changed since I was drafted, but I have a better understanding about how to control those situations I was just talking about. It’s about not worrying about the future, or what happened in the past, it’s about being in the present. So, when you asked me about those years being wasted, you kind of forget about them. I just focus on the now. CP: I haven’t achieved anything at all. MR: There’s so much more of the Christian Petracca story to unfold. CP: 100 per cent. As you say, I’m just getting started. I don’t picture myself as someone who’s at the calibre of the best players in the AFL. I’m maturing and developing and 10 good games don’t make you a great player. That’s built over five or six years and playing finals. MR: Who are the best five players in the game? CP: I’ve grown up loving Scott Pendlebury and he’s still in my top five. Dustin Martin is another one and he’s someone I’ve modelled my game on. Nat Fyfe. Maxy Gawn is another one. Lachie Neale as well. And there’s Paddy Dangerfield. MR: The great Shane Crawford said recently you had gone past Dusty. I wrote everyone’s got to chill a bit. CP: I’m on your side. It’s a great privilege to be recognised as having similar characteristics as Dustin Martin, but I’ve got a long way to go to be even associated with him and Dangerfield and a few others. I’ve always looked up to Dustin and have read about his mindfulness and mediation. Christian Petracca uses meditation to help prepare for games. MR: Have you adopted that? CP: Yeah, I do. I absolutely love it. I started it over Christmas and then over COVID time, and living down the peninsula and being around the beach and now being at Maroochydore and having the beach … it really makes you calm and peaceful and present. You just close your eyes and breathe. MR: Can you describe your pre-game mentality? CP: If you could see what I do before a game you’d be shocked. I read for half an hour in the rooms. Let’s say we play 3pm, I probably read about 2.15pm. I read The Secret. It’s about mindfulness, it’s about inner belief and positiveness. After that I do 10 minutes of breathing, just close the eyes and let thoughts come into my mind. MR: Who gave you the book? CP: My girlfriend Bella. She’s the key behind the success. She’s brought a lot of fulfilment and positivity into my life. MR: You seem really at peace with yourself. CP: I’m learning every day. The book explains about being at peace with who you are. Your own perception of yourself is the most important perception. MR: What is the one aspect that Simon Goodwin has helped you with? CP: That self belief. He’s always been there when others haven’t been there for me. We joke a lot and I call him my second dad. He’s someone who has overcome adversity in his own life and to see where he is now … the boys think he’s doing an unbelievable job. MR: There’s questions being asked of him. CP: And I think they are pretty unfair, to be honest. All 44 of us love Goody coaching us. I love him and the way he goes about it. Christian Petracca with his girlfriend Bella. MR: What do you believe is an incorrect perception of you? CP: People probably think I’m very arrogant. People don’t understand how high the expectation I have on myself. MR: Can you send me a photo of you and Bella? CP: Yeah, I’ll look for it. Bella is sitting here next to me. BELLA: Hello. MR: Have you guys had this interview on loud speaker from the start? CP: (laughing in the background) BELLA: We have and I’ve really wanted to butt in, but I didn’t. MR: I hope I wasn’t swearing too much. BELLA: Not at all. It was interesting. I was going to answer the question about the biggest misconception about Christian. People think he’s so confident, and he is charismatic and he loves people, but with self confidence, I think he comes across a lot more confident than he is. He’s still growing and evolving and in the past year I’ve seen him transform so much as a person, just with gratitude, mindfulness and the meditation. When I first met him, he had this manic energy and he’s calmed down. I think it’s his hunger that’s grown. You pressed him, like, how badly do you want this? MR: Was I too harsh? BELLA: It’s something we often talk about. You have to have this constant dedication every day, you have to wake up every day and say, ‘How badly do I want this today?’. That’s a work in progress. MR: How did you bite your tongue the whole time? BELLA: He speaks well for himself. MR: What do you think when he’s compared to Dustin Martin? BELLA: It’s a privilege to be in the same conversation, but at the same time, he’s just getting started. MR: Good to talk to you … both.
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  3. when he goes on a misogynist rant featuring his sister and mother as protagonists i'll be convinced. assuming it is him, i'm leaning to the suspicion he has changed medications or psychoanalyst dc
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  4. Is Stuie's life membership transferable?
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